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Sky

What is a Katabatic Wind?

Katabatic winds are like chilly mountain slides for air! When the air at the top of mountains or high places gets cold, it becomes heavy. Like a slide in a playground, these high places let the cold, heavy air slide down to the ground. As it slides down, it can go really fast and bring cold weather along with it, like a natural chilly breeze.

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Sky

How Hurricanes Get Their Names?

Did you know how hurricanes and typhoons get their names? Previously, no system existed; the names of the hurricanes depended on the date (for example, Hurricane Santa Anna, which happened on St. Anne’s Day) or its form (as happened with Hurricane “Pin”). There were even anecdotic cases: for example, one meteorologist from Australia used to give the hurricanes the names of politicians who voted against the budget for meteorological research.

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Sirocco Wind: Warm and Moist from Africa to Europe

There is a wind that travels all the way from North Africa to southern Europe, bringing warmth and moisture along its journey and it is called the Sirocco. The Sirocco likes to visit Southern Italy and the Balkans during the spring and autumn seasons. It happens because of the interaction between high-pressure systems over the Atlantic and low-pressure systems over the Mediterranean.

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Sky

Why Does Fog Appear?

Fog is not just a simple weather phenomenon, it’s a scientific masterpiece. From the scientific point of view, fog is the accumulation of water in the air and the further formation of little condensation products of water vapor. Moreover, the lower the temperature, the more ice crystals are there in the fog instead of water drops.

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Earth

Meteorological vs Astronomical Spring

Meteorological Spring and Astronomical Spring are two ways of defining the start of spring, but they are based on different criteria. Meteorological Spring refers to the three calendar months of March, April, and May in the Northern Hemisphere (or September, October, and November in the Southern Hemisphere). These months are considered to be spring because they generally have milder temperatures and more rainfall than the preceding winter months, and the days start to become longer.

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Sky

How is Storm Naming in Europe Different from the USA?

Europe: History & System: The practice of naming storms in Europe is relatively recent compared to the USA. It began in the 1950s for the North Atlantic storms and was more widely adopted in the 21st century. Various national meteorological agencies across Europe are responsible for naming storms. For instance, the UK’s Met Office, Ireland’s Met Éireann, and the Netherlands' Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute collaborate to name storms that impact their regions.

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Sky

Have You Seen Polar Lights?

Polar lights are one of the most beautiful natural phenomena on Earth If we were to rank the most beautiful atmospheric phenomena, we would definitely give one of the highest places to polar lights. The ideal time for them is clear frosty nights from September to March at latitudes of about 67–70°.

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