december

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Meteorological vs Astronomical Summer

Meteorological summer and astronomical summer are two different ways of defining the summer season. Meteorological summer is defined by the three warmest months of the year in a particular region, typically June, July, and August in the northern hemisphere and December, January, and February in the southern hemisphere. This definition is based on the annual temperature cycle and is primarily used by meteorologists and climatologists for weather forecasting and climate analysis.

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Have You Seen Polar Lights?

Polar lights are one of the most beautiful natural phenomena on Earth If we were to rank the most beautiful atmospheric phenomena, we would definitely give one of the highest places to polar lights. The ideal time for them is clear frosty nights from September to March at latitudes of about 67–70°.

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Meteorological vs Astronomical Winter - What's the Difference?

While many associate the winter season with cold weather, snowy landscapes and the holiday season, there is more than one way to define the beginning and end of winter. Meteorologists and astronomers use two different systems to delineate the seasons - meteorological winter and astronomical winter. Let’s explore the key differences between these two definitions of winter.

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